Tag Archives: Jesus

From Lord to Servant – From Heaven to the Cross

“[Christian leadership] seeks to serve. Encourage and inspire. Respect rather than exploit others. He reflects, prays and acts according to the words of Jesus Christ…”

Anthony D’Souza

Before one develops today´s topic, as always, it is important to mention that the English version of this article has been translated from the Spanish version of Towards Excellence (https://hacialaexcelencia.org/2022/10/09/de-senor-a-siervo-del-cielo-a-la-cruz/); not necessarily from the original texts and works of authors here cited.

Anthony D’Souza, in his book “Developing the Leader within you” states that when discussing leadership skills and people management we must remember that Christian leadership implies service. And that in fact when considering the Church or para-church organizations, this concept of service is more easily assimilated. However, when it comes to corporations and businesses in general, the term “service” is seen as out of place.

D’Souza expresses that part of the confusion may stem from a lack of understanding of the true concept of leadership. And he emphasizes that for many, leadership implies power, authority, honor, prestige, or personal advantage. And of course, none of that constitutes Christian leadership, he stresses.[1]  And, in fact, he describes it this way:

“[Christian leadership] seeks to serve. Encourage and inspire. Respect rather than exploit others. He reflects, prays and acts according to the words of Jesus Christ: ´…but whoever wants to become great among you shall be your servant, and whoever wishes to be first among you shall be your servant; as the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many’ (Matthew 20:26-28)”. (D’Souza, Developing the Leader within You 1994)

Here it is worth noting that while servant leadership is a timeless concept, the phrase “servant leadership” was coined by renowned author Robert K. Greenleaf, in his essay, “The Servant as Leader,” essay that was originally published in 1970.[2]  In that essay, Greenleaf stated:

TE-Souza-eng“A servant leader focuses on the growth and well-being of individuals and the communities to which they belong. While traditional leadership generally involves the accumulation and exercise of power by one at the “top of the pyramid,” servant leadership is different. The servant leader shares power, puts the needs of others first, and helps people develop and perform at their best.” (Greenleaf, Center for Servant Leadership 2016)

If servant leadership as a phrase was coined and spread since the 70s; its concept, its very essence is tremendously older; in fact, timeless as Greenleaf has said. And it is that more than 2,000 years ago, servant leadership was actually modeled, practiced and spread by our Lord Jesus Christ.

At the beginning of the ministry of Jesus, it was He who taught leadership to his disciples, both with the exposition of his Word and through his works. Ultimately, empowered leaders, says Anthony D’Souza, are those who challenge the status quo and forge new paths. In fact, Jesus taught his disciples to be leaders who change attitudes and traditions, as shown in Matthew 23: 1-36 and Mark 7: 9,13.[3]

In “Empowering Leadership,” another of author Anthony D’Souza’s books, he clearly states:

“With the power of Scripture, with the persuasion of vivid parables, and with the poignancy of example from his own life, He [Jesus] taught [his disciples] how to lead his people.” (D’Souza, Empowering Leadership 2001)

No one could deny that Jesus’ style of leadership was unique and unusual. Let’s look at a few instances, during which Jesus provided leadership:[4]

  • Jesus healed the leper – He really cared and responded to the needs that were presented to him.
  • He evicted the merchants from the temple and cleansed it – He confronted an entire institution.
  • He conversed with the Samaritan woman at the well – He broke down the barriers.
  • He visited the house of Zacchaeus, the publican (tax collector) – He provoked the dialogue.
  • He defended the woman whom the Pharisees wanted to stone – He bravely argued and defended his case.
  • He washed the feet of his disciples – He set the example for him.
  • He was hung on a cross – He gave his life in sacrifice, to become a reconciler.

For the purposes of this study, we will take a closer look at one of the above cases. And we will focus on the one related to the woman who was about to be stoned by the Pharisees, whose story we find in John 8:3-11.

Robert K. Greenleaf, in his essay, “The Servant as Leader,” discusses Jesus’ leadership in this passage from the following perspective:

“A leader must have more of an armor of confidence in facing the unknown — more than those who accept his leadership…a very firm belief that in the stress of real life situations one can compose oneself in a way that permits the creative process to operate…Jesus sits there writing in the sand…In the
pressure of the moment, having assessed the situation rationally, he assumes the attitude of withdrawal that will allow creative insight to function.…And a great one came, one that has kept story of the incident alive for 2,000 years —  ‘Let him that is without sin among you cast the first stone.'” (Greenleaf, The Servant as Leader 2008)

Who could have resisted these words? Who could have refuted them? As Greenleaf says, Jesus could have delighted the crowd with rational arguments about the superiority of compassion over torture. He could have presented a good logical argument for it.[5]  But he did not! And rather, with authority and knowledge he raised the challenge already stated, and then the crowd stepped back, one by one:

“But they, hearing this, accused by their conscience, went out one by one, beginning from the oldest to the last; and Jesus was left alone, and the woman who was in the middle.” (John 8:9)

Jesus was a leader; he had a goal and that was clearly to bring more compassion into people’s lives.[6]

“Jesus straightened up, and seeing no one but the woman, he said to her: Woman, where are those who accused you? Did no one condemn you? She said: None, Lord. Then Jesus said to him: Neither do I condemn you; go away and sin no more.” (John 8:10-11)

Clearly Jesus, as a servant leader, demonstrated in this episode his total compassion for the brokenhearted and even sinners. As true as this woman had sinned, it was also true that she had been publicly humiliated; and Jesus responded immediately in her defense and protection, safeguarding her dignity; without this meaning that He has tolerated her sin. On the contrary, as her Word says, Jesus did not condemn her, but he was emphatic in directing her to a life that does not contemplate sin as an alternative.

And so, continuing with our analysis of servant leadership, the renowned D.L. Moody raised the following reflection:

“The measure of a man is not how many servants he has, but how many men he serves.” (Núñez, Jesús, el hombre que desafió al mundo y confronta tu vida. “Jesus, the man who challenged the world and confronts your life” 2018)

It should then be noted that Jesus, the image of the invisible God; in fact, the very Creator of the universe was seen in different and many instances, as a servant. It is inconceivable, as stated by Dr. Miguel Núñez, that the Creator of the world was seen serving the creature. That he who sustains the universe (Hebrews 1: 3), would kneel to wash the feet of his disciples (John 13: 1-17).[7]

But Jesus, throughout his earthly life, left us, without a doubt, a model of service and humility. And to support what has been said, let us analyze how from the incarnation of Jesus to his death, this was a tremendous reality. For this purpose, we will refer to the extraordinary study presented by Miguel Núñez, in his book, “Jesus, the man who challenged the world and confronts your life.”[8]

  • Jesus, from before the creation of the world, existed in the form of God, but he did not considerSilhouette of catholic cross and sunrisehimself to be equal to God. He humbled himself, was obedient and obedient until death on the cross.

 Have this mind among yourselves, which is yours in Christ Jesus, who, though he was in the form of God, did not count equality with God a thing to be grasped, but emptied himself, by taking the form of a servant, being born in the likeness of men.  And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross.” (Philippians 2:5-8)

  • Entering this world, he does so in a manger, devoid of everything; only with the company of the earthly parents of him.

“In those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be registered. This was the first registration when Quirinius was governor of Syria. And all went to be registered, each to his own town.  And Joseph also went up from Galilee, from the town of Nazareth to Judea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and lineage of David, to be registered with Mary, his betrothed, who was with child. And while they were there, the time came for her to give birth. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling clothes and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.” (Luke 2:1-7)

  • When it came to serving, Jesus never asked his disciples to do anything that he hadn’t done before.

“You call me Teacher and Lord, and you are right, for so I am.  If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet.  For I have given you an example, that you also should do just as I have done to you.” (John 13:13-15)

  • In his triumphal entry into Jerusalem, at the time of being acclaimed as King, he does so on a donkey and not on a horse as was usual for royalty.

“And when he had said these things, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. When he drew near to Bethphage and Bethany, at the mount that is called Olivet, he sent two of the disciples, saying, “Go into the village in front of you, where on entering you will find a colt tied, on which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here.  If anyone asks you, ‘Why are you untying it?’ you shall say this: ‘The Lord has need of it.’”  So those who were sent went away and found it just as he had told them. And as they were untying the colt, its owners said to them, “Why are you untying the colt?” And they said, “The Lord has need of it.”  And they brought it to Jesus, and throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it.” (Luke 19:28-35)

  • Jesus in his first coming, brought a message of peace and not of war, with the sole purpose of reconciling man with God. Therefore, to fulfill this purpose, the only way was the cross.

“All we like sheep have gone astray;
we have turned—everyone—to his own way;
and the Lord has laid on him
the iniquity of us all.

He was oppressed, and he was afflicted,
yet he opened not his mouth;
like a lamb that is led to the slaughter,
and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent,
so he opened not his mouth.” (Isaiah 53:6-7)

  • For in him all the fullness of God was pleased to dwell, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether on earth or in heaven, making peace by the blood of his cross. (Colossians 1:19-20)

With all of the above, it is important that we as servant leaders understand this profound teaching so that our leadership reflects the character of Jesus and replicates his model of leadership. Núñez sums it up this way:

  • “There is no exaltation without humiliation: the incarnation first and the glorification later.
  • There is no glory without suffering: the cross and then the glory.
  • There is no crown without a cross: first the service and then the coronation”. (Núñez, Jesus, the man who challenged the world and confronts your life 2018)

And he magnificently adds:

“In a single sentence uttered by Jesus it is shown the model of his leadership: ‘the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve’ (Matthew 20:28). His life of service so honored the Father that, in Philippians 2:9-11, the apostle Paul says that the Father gave him a name above all names ‘ so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth,  and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.’” (Núñez, Jesus, the man who challenged the world and confronts your life 2018)

Extraordinarily, the Lord of lords humbled himself as a servant, left his throne in heaven, stripped Himself of His royalty and still did not spare being equal to God; and He came to earth with only one purpose, to reconcile the sinner with God, giving His life as a ransom for many; He humbled Himself to the utmost and was obedient to the point of death on the cross! He died so that through His death we sinners may have life and life to the full!

[1] Anthony D´Souza, Developing the Leader within You (Singapore: Haggai Centre for Advanced Leadership Studies, 1994), 4-5.

[2] Robert K. Greenleaf, “The Servant as Leader,” https://www.greenleaf.org/what-is-servant-leadership/

[3] Anthony D´Souza, Empowering Leadership (Singapore: Haggai Institute, 2001), ix-xi.

[4] Anthony D´Souza, Empowering Leadership (Singapore: Haggai Institute, 2001), x.

[5] Robert K. Greenleaf, The Servant as Leader (Westfiel, IN: The Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership, 2008), 29.

[6] Robert K. Greenleaf, The Servant as Leader (Westfield, IN: The Greenleaf Center for Servant Leadership, 2008), 29.

[7] Miguel Núñez, Jesús, el hombre que desafió al mundo y confronta tu vida (Nashville, NT: B&H Publishing Group, 2018), 37.

[8] Miguel Núñez, Jesús, el hombre que desafió al mundo y confronta tu vida (Nashville, NT: B&H Publishing Group, 2018), 38.

A Heart Marked by the Excellence of God

“Man is said to be after the image of God, not as regards his body, but as regards that whereby he excels other animals…by his reason and intelligence.”

St. Thomas

Very happy to share with you a new article in the series on the “Excellence of God.” Enjoy it!

Having understood that the mark of God’s excellence is the image of Him impregnated within the soul of the human being; and even more so, having understood that Jesus is the living image, the exact reproduction of God the Creator Father; the precise path has been traced to elucidate how the heart of God is reflected in the heart of the human being.

Let us consider here the reasoning of St. Thomas, which reads as follows:

“Man is said to be after the image of God, not as regards his body, but as regards that whereby he excels other animals. Hence, when it is said, Let us make man in our image and likeness, it is added, And let him have dominion over the fishes of the sea (Genesis 1.26). Now man excels all animals by his reason and intelligence; hence it is according to his intelligence and reason, which are incorporeal, that man is said to be according to the image of God.” (Piper, Desiring God 1971)

St Thomas

John Piper, in his study “The Image of God”, shares the following support in this line:

“The early church fathers were quite agreed that the image of God in man consisted primarily in man’s rational and moral characteristics, and in his capacity for holiness.” (Piper, Desiring God 1971)

Thus, God has deposited in the heart of the human being a part of His being, establishing a great difference between the creation of man and woman; and the other created beings, such is the case of the animals, who do not carry within themselves the image of the Triune Creator God.

According to the analysis of David Casas and Russell Fuller, in their article “God’s Image – The Difference Maker,” when examining how man is similar to God, it is excludeH of course the physical body since God is Spirit (John 4:24). And, on the other hand, creature limitations are excluded since God is infinite, eternal, and immutable in all His attributes (Psalm 90:2; Malachi 3:6; Jeremiah 23:24). On the other hand, man resembles God by having a free, rational, and personal spirit, which includes, say the authors, a conscience with the law of God written in his heart; therefore, man can rule over nature in a similar way as God reigns.[1]  Let us quote Romans 2 here to support this truth:

“For when Gentiles, who do not have the law, by nature do what the law requires, they are a law to themselves, even though they do not have the law. They show that the work of the law is written on their hearts, while their conscience also bears witness, and their conflicting thoughts accuse or even excuse them on that day when, according to my gospel, God judges the secrets of men by Christ Jesus.” (Romans 2:14-16)

Therefore, the heart of the human being is not only marked by the image of God, but the very law of God has been written in it. And this, without exception, all human beings, men and women; boys, and girls; healthy and sick; without socioeconomic distinction. Absolutely all of us are bearers of the image of God; and we all carry the law of God written in our hearts. In the same way for both believers and unbelievers. All human creation, without exception!

The fact that man resembles God, that his heart bears God’s mark of excellence, has at least three profound implications.

According to the study by Casas and Fuller, the following are said implications,[2]  which we will detail one by one.

1. The Image of God Establishes Human Dignity

Here it is possible to expose the atheistic and the pantheistic thought. According to the cited authors, by denying the image of God, atheism diminishes human dignity and reduces man to a fortuitous or casual event, as if he were an evolutionary product of matter, or a simple animal. Pantheism, on the other hand, denies the image of God and instead diminishes human dignity by exalting all of nature as a manifestation of God.

The Scriptures, however, testify to the dignity of man. Being created in the image and likeness of God, he is positioned above all nature. For this purpose, let us quote two very appropriate passages:

“Yet you have made him a little lower than the heavenly beingsand crowned him with glory and honor. You have given him dominion over the works of your hands; you have put all things under his feet” (Psalm 8:5-6)

“Look at the birds of the air: they neither sow nor reap nor gather into barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not of more value than they?” (Matthew 6:26)

2. The Image of God Establishes the Sacredness of Life

The authors point out that atheist cultures reject the sacredness of life while devaluing the lives of the born and unborn as state policy. However, the Word of God protects the sacredness of life in its laws. And with respect to this subject, what is stated in Genesis 9:6 has been sufficiently discussed before (in previous articles). God decrees that if someone commits murder, the murderer must still lose his life, because man is made in the image of God. The authors here emphasize that the crime is really a direct assault against God. In fact, in a situation, such as the one exposed in Genesis 9:6, God will personally search for the murderer and will hold him responsible.

Along these lines, it is interesting how John Calvin observed that because man is the bearer of the image of God, God considers Himself “violated in his person”, in other words, “the victim”. Therefore, he says, you cannot harm another human being without harming God Himself.

The authors conclude that God created the sacred life of man. If this life is destroyed, there is no other way than divine judgment.

3. The Image of God Establishes the Necessity for God’s Redemption

If man would not have the image of God in his being, in his heart, the plan of redemption simply would not exist. It should be clarified that the above does not imply that possessing the image of God entitles sinners to redemption, but redemption requires that sinners have been created in His image.

It is tremendously interesting how Casas and Fuller explore this topic. And they say that God’s purpose for sending His Son in the likeness of man was to renew the image of God in humanity through the Gospel. Let’s examine Ephesians 4:

“and to put on the new self, created after the likeness of God in true righteousness and holiness.” (Ephesians 4:24)

In fact, Christians have been known and predestined to conform to the image of His Son, according to Romans 8:

“For those whom He foreknew He also predestined to be conformed to the image of His Son, in order that He might be the firstborn among many brothers.” (Romans 8:29)

Thus, the gospel, once received, renews the image that was marred both by Adam’s sin and by our own sin so that the believer can “bear the image of the heavenly”:

“Thus, it is written, ´The first man Adam became a living being´; the last Adam became a life-giving spirit… Just as we have borne the image of the man of dust, we shall also bear the image of the man of heaven.” (1 Corinthians 15:45,49)

Image of beautiful young couple drinking coffee while walking by

Because God created us in His image, thus being crowned with glory and honor, and because of His infinite grace toward us undeserving sinners, God sent His Son to redeem us.

As human beings, we are tremendously privileged because our hearts have been marked with the very image of the invisible God. He has bestowed upon us dignity and holiness. He has instilled courage in us, regardless of our condition.

And not only that, but in the midst of our sinful condition, a condition that separates us and breaks communion with our Creator; and because of this, we are judged, singled out or discarded by our environment; it is amazing to know that He Himself has prepared the way for our redemption and restoration. Jesus Christ, the image of the invisible God, is such a way. And here it is worth quoting 2 Corinthians:

“And even if our gospel is veiled, it is veiled to those who are perishing.In their case the god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelievers, to keep them from seeing the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God.” (2 Corinthians 4:3-4)

Thus, for all the above, it is clear that Jesus is the image and fullness of God; therefore, human beings reestablish the image of God in their hearts, in His being, while Christ becomes the very center of their lives.

The excellence of the heart of God was definitely impregnated in our heart, now it is we who must expand the heart of God wherever we go.[3]


[1] David Casas and Russell Fuller, “God´s Image – The Difference Maker,” Answers in Genesis, https://answersingenesis.org/are-humans-animals/gods-image-difference-maker/

[2] David Casas and Russell Fuller, “God´s Image – The Difference Maker,” Answers in Genesis, https://answersingenesis.org/are-humans-animals/gods-image-difference-maker/

[3] Cecilia Yépez, “Excellence Stems from the Heart – Part 2”, Blog “Towards Excellence”, https://towardsexcellence.org/2017/04/10/excellence-stems-from-the-heart-part-2/

Jesus, the Image of the Invisible God

The Triune Creator God intends that a similar sense of fellowship, obedience, and love be the hallmarks of human relationship with Him, and that humans are united in love.

Now, to understand even more about the image of God, we will address the character of Jesus and his actions, since He is the perfect example of what human nature should have been. Again, and as presented by Erickson, we will refer part of his analysis for the purpose of this study, thus:[1]

  • Jesus had a perfect fellowship with the Father. A magnificent example of this is seen in John 17, through which it is affirmed that Jesus and the Father are one (v. 21, 22). Also, that Jesus glorifies the Father and that the Father glorifies Jesus (v. 1, 4, 5, 22, 24).
  • Jesus obeyed the Father’s will perfectly. And for that matter, it is important that we quote a couple of passages, like this:

“Jesus said to them: My food is that I do the will of Him who sent me, and to finish His work.” (John 4:34)

“I can of Myself do nothing. As I hear, I judge; and My judgment is righteous, because I do not seek My own will but the will of the Father who sent Me.” (John 5:30)

Crown of thorns, hammer, bloody nails on ground. Good Friday, Passion of Jesus Christ. Christian Easter holiday. Top view, copy space. Crucifixion, resurrection of Jesus Christ. Gospel, salvation

“…Father, if it is Your will, take this cup away f from Me; nevertheless, not My will, but Yours, be done.” (Luke 22:42)

In these three shared passages, Jesus’ total submission to the Father is observed during his earthly life, such submission even in the Garden of Gethsemane, submission that led him in obedience to death and death on the cross.

  • Jesus always displayed a strong love for human beings. Again, let’s share a couple of passages for the respective analysis:

“But when He saw the multitudes, He was moved with compassion for them, because they were weary and scattered, like sheep having no shepherd.” (Matthew 9:36)

“Then Jesus, moved with compassion, stretched out His hand and touched him, and said to him, ´I am willing; be cleansed´.” (Mark 1:41)

“When the Lord saw her, He had compassion on her and said to her, ´Do not weep´. ” (Luke 7:13)

“Then Jesus said, ´Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they do´.” (Luke 23:34)

We observe here Jesus’ concern for the lost sheep of Israel, his compassion and sorrow for the sick and suffering in general, as well as his patience and forgiveness for those who have failed.

The Triune Creator God intends that a similar sense of fellowship, obedience, and love be the hallmarks of human relationship with Him, and that humans are united in love. Erickson emphasizes that we are fully human only when we manifest these characteristics.

Col 1-15_engAnd so, we human beings who are bearers of the divine image, learn from Jesus, the image of the invisible God. The apostle Paul makes this clear in chapter 1 of his Epistle to the Colossians:

“He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation.” (Colossians 1:15)

And in fact, Colossians also corroborates it, in chapter 2:

“For in Him [Christ] dwells all the fullness of the Godhead bodily.” (Colossians 2:9)

It is extraordinary to understand through Scripture (Colossians 1:15-17) the great creative power of Jesus; and at the same time, how Jesus divests himself of this great divine power and incarnates himself, so that He comes to dwell on Earth and not only that, but also humbles himself and gives his life for the sin of humanity. Jesus existed before the foundation of time. Jesus reveals God to us and teaches us human beings, bearers of God’s image, how to act as such bearers. Philippians 2, is a very good example:

“Let this mind be in you which was also in Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation, taking the form of a bondservant, and coming in the likeness of men. And being found in appearance as a man, He humbled Himself and became obedient to the point of death, even the death of the cross. Therefore, God also has highly exalted Him and given Him the name which is above every name…” (Philippians 2:5-9)

Returning to Colossians 1:15, it is important to highlight that when speaking of Jesus as the “image of the invisible God”, in the Greek the word εἰκών [eikon] means that He is the exact projection, the photograph, the very reproduction of the invisible God. Jesus Christ himself said it in John 14:8-10, that he who has seen Him has seen the Father. Therefore, Roberto Miranda affirms that whoever has seen Jesus in his person, in his character, in his perfect power, in his glory, in his perfect Word, in his teachings he has definitely seen the Father. The essence of Jesus is the very essence of the Father.[2]

[1] Millard J. Erickson, Christian Theology (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2003), 533-534.

[2] Roberto Miranda, “La imagen del Dios invisible”, leondejuda.org, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k_31l_MPYFE

Light beyond Christmas!

“The incandescent Christmas lights will soon go out… Jesus, the Light of the world, will never be extinguished.”

Cecy Yépez

There is almost no place in the world, in which during this time the cities are lit and illuminated. And in the largest metropolises, this is tremendously evident. Intense and colorful lights adorn parks, shopping malls, large buildings, and certainly residential neighborhoods. Throughout the month of December, this is the most common experience around the world.

And yes, this custom probably brings joy, enthusiasm and lifts the spirits of many; forgetting for a moment the tremendous challenges, difficulties and obstacles faced throughout the year. But how long will your enthusiasm last? The lights will eventually go out probably at the start of the new year.

However, there is a light that will never go out – Christ Jesus, the real reason for Christmas who did not come to illuminate a certain time of the year. More than 2000 years ago, Jesus, God Himself, came to this world with a special purpose, to give His life as a ransom for many, for you and for me; so, that recognizing that we are sinners, that we are not righteous in ourselves, we would realize the great need for a Savior. Let us then recognize the great need to be brought out of the darkness into His marvelous light.

Don’t we live in a world awash in darkness? A world full of evil – violence and abuse in all forms, corruption on a grand scale, deception on all levels, depression, and self-destruction; and this just to name a few elements of this vast world of evil.

TE-Christmas-2021The incandescent Christmas lights will soon go out and just hold out for a few more weeks. Jesus, the Light of the world, will never be extinguished. He desires with all His heart to come and dwell in your life and illuminate it from today and forever. He longs to bring you from death to life, from darkness to His marvelous light.

Please, decide today to leave behind the world of darkness that has surrounded you until now; and open your heart to Jesus Christ, who tells you: “I am the Light of the world; the one who follows Me will not walk in the darkness, but will have the Light of life.” (John 8:12)

If you do so, you can genuinely celebrate your first and true Christmas!

Christmas in prayer!

“Do not be afraid; for behold, I bring you good news of great joy which will be for all the people…” 

 

This Christmas, at “Towards Excellence”, we will take time to pray for our faithful readers around the world.

And we pray that the peace of Jesus Christ, the Savior of the world, the peace that surpasses all understanding, may be poured out in the lives of each of our readers. May Jesus, the Prince of Peace, be manifest in their lives, even in the midst of the turbulence and uncertainties that may be surrounding  them this Christmas season.

For those who already have the privilege of having a personal relationship with Jesus, may that relationship be even more strengthened, may each person set his or her gaze on “things above” and not on earthly things; that in the midst of the confusion that this world lives, their gaze may be placed on the Throne of God, a throne that is immovable. May their trust be in the King of kings, Jesus, and not in the ephemeral governments and systems of this world.

And for those who still do not know Christ and have not established a personal relationship with Him, we pray that all spiritual bandages will be removed from their eyes, and that they may recognize in the depths of their hearts that they are sinners, like everyone else because the Word of God says that “There is no righteous person, not even one”; and that they may come to repentance and to understand the need of salvation for their lives. May Jesus Christ supernaturally reveal Himself in their lives and bring them salvation, peace, joy, and His marvelous light in the midst of the darkness that they are surely facing.

We pray that the miracle of the first Christmas, more than 2000 years ago, will be an extraordinary reality this Christmas, in the heart of each person who decides to dispose his or her heart, as the manger was arranged, to receive the Messiah, the Savior of the world who yearns to be the Savior of their lives.

It is our prayer that we are all willing to listen to the sweet voice of our beloved Jesus, who is knocking today at the door of our hearts; so we clearly and confidently listen: “Do not be afraid; for behold, I bring you good news of great joy which will be for all the people…” (Luke 2:10).

We pray thus in the Name which is above every name, in Jesus Christ!